Permaculture in the high country; practical use and guidance.

Permaculture Practice

Where to start is to read The Permaculture Design Course Handbook.

It leads you through the 11 design principles whose goal is a community of plants and animals acting in coordination for mutual benefit. When thoughtfully placed near each other (relative location) each element provides at least three functions for other elements. Principles maximize energy cycling and plans keep resources within your landscape. Perma – also means you lessen effort through a long term planting and animal integration plan. Water is managed according to slope and best principles for reuse.

Some of the principles I use in my garden are:

  • Energy cycling through cascading nutrients (composting)
  • Long term planting plans.

Inspiration and Techniques

This site introduces dry natives with both edible and soil enhancing properties. In cold, arid conditions where soils might be poor, nitrogen fixing plants are key to growing without additions to the soil. Some notable plants are the

serviceberry that tick all the boxes. They are lovely, smell delicious, and have great berries for Jam and are native. I think my nephew might have a few of these that I might be able to trade for the choke cherry plant I have.

Amelanchier alnifolia

Useful Plants from Robert Nold’s “High and Dry”

In the high country you have

Articles

http://kdnk.org/programs/living-permaculture

Growing food with forests

Food Forest Groundcover Plantings

When you are looking at a place with an open ground

It all begins with a Fruit Tree Guild

Straw Bale Garden

My experiment with keeping Bees — well naturally anyway. If I can find time, I would love to keep hives. I just have too much else to do. And the shoulder isn’t helping get the things done. But its good to learn how to keep bees if you intend to go off grid. Homesteading the

The bee swarm

Fruit for free…

I like this blog about growing fruit in England. They take the same tack I do when thinking of the garden. Its not just a place to make pretty but to make yourself and wildlife thrive! I have to wonder how well the espaliered against a warming surface like peaches have done for them?

I have grown my own peaches from seed. They are now 3 years old and ready to be espaliered.

We may not get real good peaches as they say the seed doesn’t reflect the fruit that surrounds it but more like the stock. They use stocks that are more cold hardy to keep peach trees viable during late freeze and extra bad winters.

The fun of discovery is not just seeing something grow, but enjoying all it can bring from a vision, to scent, to taste. While I often get stuck at something to grow… I have to wonder how great it would be to getting the vision, scent and taste down to boot! I have focused on making my bees and others happy, now is time to bring together the permaculture!

Can I be a Habitat Hero?

Other Resources

solar panel generates potable H2O

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