Dropseed and Little Bluestem grasses arrive; soon big bluestem as well

The grasses that will make up the main fill for the prairie substrate  includes two native grasses that will provide both habitat and structure.

These little beauties arrived 5/16/2019

The intention was to allow acclimation 2 days in shade of patio and then move to sun.

But it snowed this last Tuesday 5/21 so this afternoon they will see the first sun.

;   ;

Foreground: bergamot Middleground:bluestem grass Far: dropseed

 

A wave of dropseed and cosmos; a wave of bluestem and ; a wave of grass

I learned that the natural form of shrubs and other groups of plants is a teardrop or kidney bean shape.

The wave as screening will be big bluestem, Andropogon. This is a warm season grass that can reach a height of four to seven feet with flowerheads of a feathery purple. I believe there is Andropogon in the Kings capture basin.  I need to take of just how soft the look is.  I can imagine those heads in the afternoon sun the lazy flow.

BERGAMOT will take up residence soon where I normally plant cucumber.  This year the veg garden rests and the yard goes wild in a fashion.  This is the year I find a way to make it happen.  So back to it this afternoon.

 

Other ideas

Rabbitbrush to repeat the rounded yellow of the spirea. Inspiration for adding rabbitbrush : Lifescapecolorado.com

 Purchased:  5/18

(8) Big Bluestem andropogon-gerardii Height 4-8 Feet   Spread 4-5 Feet  Spacing 24 Inches

Native clump grass, gray  to blue-green stems in spring, green alternating with deep red in summer, then to coppery red in fall. Moist meadows and roadsides and rivers – but can be drought tolerant.

Three-fingered seed heads top tall stems in August.

(4) Smooth Aster aster-laevis   Height:2-4 ft. Spread: 2 -4

Late summer blooming through fall with a stiff flowerhead, 1″ violet to blue petas with yellow center.

To encourage density, plants can be cut back to 6” in late spring.  Pruning is usually not necessary because this aster has strong stems that rarely flop.  Dry soil, in prairies.  Plants host caterpillars of the Pearl Crescent Butterflies.

Blooms in august

(4) Prairie Smoke Geum Triflorum

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